Posts Tagged ‘own’

EZ Container Gardening AND Pineapple Update

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

Easy method for successfully growing garden plants in small containers on your porch or in limited space and STILL have very heathy plants as well as get huge harvests. Plus as requested by countless (countless I say!!) viewers, an update on the pineapple plant grown from a pineapple top. Demonstration of how to transplant the pineapple to ensure maximum growth and healthy fruit production. Now wasn’t THAT a bit long-winded? I got dizzy just typing it! 🙂

Sites You May Find Helpful

    Post to Twitter

    How to Plant a Vegetable Garden

    Sunday, December 26th, 2010

    Expand the description and view the text of the steps for this how-to video. Check out Howcast for other do-it-yourself videos from TreehouseFlicks and more videos in the Vegetable Gardening category. You can contribute too! Create your own DIY guide at www.howcast.com or produce your own Howcast spots with the Howcast Filmmakers Program at www.howcast.com Grow some of your own food by starting a vegetable garden. You’ll eat better and save money. To complete this How-To you will need: A sunny garden spot A wire mesh fence Seeds or seedlings Flowers A soil test A sunny garden spot A wire mesh fence Seeds or seedlings Flowers A soil test Step 1: Decide on a garden type Decide between a raised-bed garden or an in-ground one. Raised beds, which consist of purchased topsoil that sits within a wooden frame, are ideal if your soil is stony or sandy. The main advantage of an in-ground garden is that it needs less watering. Tip: For an in-ground garden, test your soil to find out what nutrients it needs. Garden centers sell do-it-yourself kits, or you can arrange a test through the Cooperative Extension System, a national agricultural network. Find a nearby office on the USDA web site. Step 2: Pick a good spot Pick a spot that gets a lot of sun and isn’t obscured by tree or hedge shade. Step 3: Prep the land Prepare the land by building your raised bed or clearing and tilling a patch of land to a depth of about one foot. A 10 foot by 10 foot parcel is a good size for a beginner

    Sites You May Find Helpful

    Post to Twitter

    Buy Gardening Gifts
    Categories